A Very Good Year

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A Very Good Year

The month of December has come to a close
the weather has brought a new blanket of snow
Christmas has faded from Rudolph’s red nose
looks like it’s time for the new year.

To the party we go with our friends in tow
faces aglow and dressed in our best
jollification where ever we go
looks like it’s time for the New Year.

Champagne is flowing as midnight draws near
resolutions are made as we watch the ball drop
we raise up our glasses to toast to good cheer
that this New Year, be a very good year!

© Rebecca Sanchez 2011

Here’s to wishing you, and yours, a very good year from the bottom of my heart!

The poem was published on Bekkie In Wonderland in 2011, and now again, in 2016. The cards are copies of vintage New Year cards/postcards from the Victorian Era.

Shared with Poets UnitedImaginary Garden Of Real Toads and all friends I’ve written with over the years!

About “Time-Balls”

The actual notion of a ball “dropping” to signal the passage of time dates back long before New Year’s Eve was ever celebrated in Times Square. The first “time-ball” was installed atop England’s Royal Observatory at Greenwich in 1833. This ball would drop at one o’clock every afternoon, allowing the captains of nearby ships to precisely set their chronometers (a vital navigational instrument).

Around 150 public time-balls are believed to have been installed around the world after the success at Greenwich, though few survive and still work. The tradition is carried on today in places like the United States Naval Observatory in Washington, DC, where a time-ball descends from a flagpole at noon each day – and of course, once a year in Times Square, where it marks the stroke of midnight not for a few ships’ captains, but for over one billion people watching worldwide.

About time-balls is from a Google search.

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17 thoughts on “A Very Good Year

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