Tanaga #31718 (Faded Clover)

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Tanaga #31718 (Faded Clover)

I found a four-leaf-clover
I picked and turned it over
now I’m the lucky holder
both fade as we grow older.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2018

I’m not Irish with a name like Sanchez but I found this 4 leaf clover decades ago in Indiana and put it in this old prescription bottle (they used to be glass with plastic stoppers in my dad’s day) where it’s stayed to this day. I’ve never taken the top off but I doubt it’d hurt it much although it could crumble now. I think I’ll leave it be but wanted to share it with my Tanaga today.

Written with my friends at the Imaginary Garden With Real Toads for St. Pat’s Day.

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Tanaga #31018

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Tanaga #31018

Let’s have some fun with a pun
laugh like a son-of-a-gun
make with an oxymoron
depends on the trip your-on.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2018

This was great fun to write! The artwork is mine called The Calm.

Writing a Tanaga with the Imaginary Garden With Real Toads. Shared with my friends at dVerse~Poets Pub Saturday.

Tanaga #11617

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Tanaga #11617

Slow and steady wins the race
when you keep a steady pace
watch your step and keep your head
you will finish first instead.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2017

The Tanaga is a type of Filipino poem, consisting of four lines with seven syllables each with the same rhyme at the end of each line — that is to say a 7-7-7-7 Syllabic verse, with an AABB rhyme scheme.

Like the Japanese haiku, Tanagas traditionally do not have any titles. They are poetic forms that should speak for themselves. Most are handed down by oral history, and contain proverbial forms, moral lessons, and snippets of a code of ethics.

Try one for yourself!

Written for Monday WRites and Poets United.