Haiku #10317

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haiku #10317

leaves fall on the water
snowy egrets roost
autumn at high tide

Written for the prompt “fall” at Haiku Horizons. The photograph is mine taken while cycling on the San Francisco Bay and waterways. Snowy Egrets only roost at certain times of the day and season.

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The Lost Masterpiece

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The Lost Masterpiece

An artist surveys the picturesque scene below
picking up his brush he hesitates;

The night sky above was glorious
he’d never seen so many colors of blue
dotted with light billowy clouds
covered by a never-ending Milky Way.

A sleepy town lay in the valley
nestled between mountain peaks
joined by meadows of yellow flowers
a small sliver of moon watching over all.

The bell in the church steeple rang out
when all was quiet, an owl asked; “Who? Who?”
The artist didn’t know
his canvas as blank as his mind.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2014

This poem was written for a Magpie photo prompt in 2014. Shared here for the first time from Picturesque Words and linked with my friends at Poets United.

Tanka #9917

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tanka #9917

trapped rain drops glisten
suspended in the gloaming
bright beads on silk strands
capturing the faint moon light
worn by a cold autumn night

© Rebecca Sanchez 2017

An image prompt from Positively Prompted on Google Plus. I wrote a Tanka about this image prompt. Shared with my friends at dVerse~Poets Pub.

Situating Suburbia

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Surviving slippery slopes
swerving, sliding sideways
with speedometer spinning
substantial suspension stabilization
while shifting and signaling sanctimoniously
successfully situating suburbia-
sudden stop.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2013

This is a form I like to use called alliteration. It’s a challenge to write them so they make sense or tell a story. I’ve written a handful of them so far.

Alliteration occurs when a series of words in a row (or close to a row) have the same first consonant sound. For example, “She sells seashells down by the seashore” or “Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Peppers” are both alliterative phrases. In the former, all the words start with the “s” sound, while in the later, the letter “p” takes precedence. Aside from tongue twisters, the alliteration is also used in poems, song lyrics, and even store or brand names.

Pale Roses

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Pale Roses 

Pale roses fill the air with fragrance
as I bend to make a wish in the fountain
my coin is received with a golden splash.

Brass lion heads dispense water with a roar
in this serene quintessential garden
I lay myself down in a soft bed of grass.

My breathing slows as my thoughts follow
into a meditative reverie
thoughts pass floccinaucinihilipilification.

Leisurely plucking a nearby rose for my hair
a thorn sinks deep into soft flesh
blood trickles a bright red.

Jamming my finger in my mouth
I stand and gather my wits about me
bare feet heading for the back door.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2014

This was originally a Magpie Tale write. I reworked the art and wrote this poem about it. I imagined myself in this garden making a wish as described above. I enjoyed having a surprise ending here, a kind of “wake up and smell the roses” (or something like that.)

Spare The Air

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Spare The Air

It’s lunch hour in San Francisco on a foggy day. The sun tries to shed some light on the subject burning through the layers of car exhaust and jet streams from the nearby airport. The rush hour is in full force as drivers slowly move in lines like ants on the various freeways trying to free themselves of their cars. The local news station warns residents that it’s a Spare The Air Day.

Seated on a park bench near the bay munching on a sandwich the view is amazing. The yellow, orange and crimson streaks of color in the sky are beautiful. The sun is weaving in and out of the cloud layer making the afternoon light look magical. Without some pollution, the colors would never be quite like that. I am reminded of how a little smog can still be admired and enjoyed.

noon sun shimmers
a bayside Kodachrome moment
spare the air lunch hour

© Rebecca Sanchez 2017

Photography by +Woojin Yu follow his work on Google+.

A haibun written with my friends at dVerse~Poets Pub. In California, a Spare The Air Day is when the air is still and polluted to the point that making fires in fireplaces, burning garbage and other things that could add to the problem are prohibited until further notice. This is because we have very strict pollution laws. Although this picture looks like total pollution it’s mostly fog which we have a lot here. Despite my words, California has some of the best air in the US because most of our pollution goes down to the central valley.