The Capture


The Capture

An ice crystal begins
high in the clouds
a freezing water droplet
attaching to a dust particle
as it falls back to earth
water vapor freezes
building the six arms of the snowflake
no two are alike
as they plummet
towards my open mouth
where the new snowflake
the color of water
melts on my tongue
tasting of ozone and triumph.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2018

Source of photo: Alexey Kljatov, animation by me.

This is a “found poem” where I took a part of something I found and used it in a new poem. Yesterday was the first day of spring but some aren’t feeling it yet as the snow sticks around. Written for the prompt color with my friends at Poets United.


Haiku #1518 and Tanka


Tanka…Nobe Okuri 野辺送り

a neighbor’s
funeral in new year week
fluffy snow flowers
from heaven
falling on his coffin…

©2018Rika Inami稲美里佳

My answer:

haiku #1518

snowflakes from heaven
a winter coat of sadness
covers his coffin

© Rebecca Sanchez 2018

Rika Inami is a well-known tanka poet who writes in her language and English. She takes walks in her native Japan taking photos and composing tanka about them. She’s also a friend of mine and a very sweet lady.

She posts her work daily on Google Plus and if you answer her work she’ll post it on her blog. This was my answer to her photo (above) and tanka.

April Crocus


April Crocus

When it seems like old man winter
will never lose his icy grip
dainty goblet-shaped Crocus
push through the melting snow.

Yellow, white and purple flowers
putting on their Easter finest
a colorful revival and early arrival
that fills us with new hope
welcoming the coming spring.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2017

Shared with Monday WRites for Holy Week and Poets United.




There are reasons for our seasons
as we watch for yearly clues
in the summer we have flowers
multicolored meadows viewed.

Then the trees turn glorious colors
dying leaves fall to the ground
before the burning bonfires end
winter’s come without a sound.

When the Crocuses start blooming
and I heed the robin’s call
spring will bring her wondrous renewal.
Good reasons for us all.

© Rebecca Sanchez 2013

I wanted to write a poem about the seasons while naming them within the poem. There were a few versions of this before I finally got the words the way I wanted them and I’m happy with the way it turned out.

A past musing shared with my friends at Poets United.

Haibun #2717


haibun #2717

Late in winter biking by
I heard a piercing skyward cry
I saw a large bird in the sky
an eagle looked me in the eye
I stopped a spell to watch it fly.

As I continued on my way
along the San Francisco Bay
the waters being calm that day
I watched the shorebirds interplay
stalking the waters for their prey.

the snowy egret
serves dinner
with a splash

© Rebecca Sanchez 2017

I talk, write and live bicycles because it’s made me so healthy and happy. I ride my bike from my apartment to the San Francisco Bay Trail every other day. This is an area of woods, natural harbors, wetlands, tidal pools and all the creatures that live there. I often take photos and write about them like today.

The photographs (3 frames) were taken by James Graham (my roommate) and animated by me.

Written with dVerse~Poets Pub for Haibun Monday and shared with Imaginary Garden Of Real Toads for The Tuesday Platform. I see no reason why a haibun can’t rhyme, is there one?

Early Crocus (Too Soon)


Early Crocus (Too Soon)

Deep in the earth it was time to wake
wake and bloom my place to take
sleeping all winter under the ground
waiting for spring so I could astound
sending out shoots for over a week
ready I was to have my first peek
slowly opening ready to show
only to find myself covered in snow!

© Rebecca Sanchez 2017

I got this idea from the Crocus (which sometimes blooms in the snow) and this image. The Crocus is one of my favorite flowers we used to have them in the backyard in Indiana and they always came up first.

Written with dVerse~Poets Pub.

A Very Good Year




A Very Good Year

The month of December has come to a close
the weather has brought a new blanket of snow
Christmas has faded from Rudolph’s red nose
looks like it’s time for the new year.

To the party we go with our friends in tow
faces aglow and dressed in our best
jollification where ever we go
looks like it’s time for the new year.

Champagne is flowing as midnight draws near
resolutions are made as we watch the ball drop
we raise up our glasses to toast to good cheer
that this New Year, be a very good year!

© Rebecca Sanchez 2011

Here’s to wishing you, and yours, a very good year from the bottom of my heart!

The poem was published on Bekkie In Wonderland in 2011, and now again, in 2016. The cards are copies of vintage New Year cards/postcards from the Victorian Era.

Shared with Poets UnitedImaginary Garden Of Real Toads and all friends I’ve written with over the years!

About “Time-Balls”

The actual notion of a ball “dropping” to signal the passage of time dates back long before New Year’s Eve was ever celebrated in Times Square. The first “time-ball” was installed atop England’s Royal Observatory at Greenwich in 1833. This ball would drop at one o’clock every afternoon, allowing the captains of nearby ships to precisely set their chronometers (a vital navigational instrument).

Around 150 public time-balls are believed to have been installed around the world after the success at Greenwich, though few survive and still work. The tradition is carried on today in places like the United States Naval Observatory in Washington, DC, where a time-ball descends from a flagpole at noon each day – and of course, once a year in Times Square, where it marks the stroke of midnight not for a few ships’ captains, but for over one billion people watching worldwide.

About time-balls source: Google search.